Understanding Your Period’s Menstrual Cycle

Hot Health
By Hot Health January 5, 2017 09:00
Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /home/hothealt/public_html/wp-content/themes/allegro-theme/functions/other.php on line 93
Updated

Understanding Your Period’s Menstrual Cycle

Sharing is caring!

Understanding the Menstrual Cycle

Menstruation is a complex biological process that occurs monthly in the female body to prepare the body for pregnancy. The menstrual cycle roughly refers to the date on which the woman is expected to start menstruating and the number of days for which she will menstruate. According to researchers, the hormonal cycle of a female greatly affects the menstrual cycle in duration as well as extremity. The process of menstruation is exclusive to the human race however some mammals such as chimpanzee also undergo this process. In the female human, the average age of menstruation is 12 to 14 years; right around the time when girls hit puberty. The cycle begins at the first day of blood flow from the vagina and continues for four to seven days. Two menstrual cycles of a woman differ typically by 28 days but a gap of 21 or 34 days is completely acceptable.

In a typical 28 day cycle, a female’s ovulation occurs on day 14 and the menstruation (commonly referred to as the period) begins 14 days post ovulation. The time period between the beginning of the period the and completion of ovulation is variable but the time gap between the completion of the ovulation and the first day of menstruation is always between 12 to 14 days. When a woman is likely to get pregnant, it happens either on the day of ovulation or 3 days preceding ovulation.

How does the female body prepare itself for Menstruation?

Four major glands and organs are responsible for preparing the female body for menstruation. The Hypothalamus, the first gland, is found just above the pituitary gland in the brain. The pituitary gland is the second organ. The ovaries come next which resemble a walnut in size and sit behind the uterus. And the fourth gland is the uterus—a muscular cavity that rests between the bladder and the rectum.

The glands and organs work together and lead to the secretion of five major hormones—gonadotropin releasing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estrogen and progesterone which play a rather significant role in creating, and regulating, the menstrual cycle of a female.

Creation of the Menstrual Cycle

The initial stage of a menstrual cycle is perhaps the most mutable stage and is medically known as the follicular stage. The hypothalamus signals the pituitary gland to secrete the gonadotropin releasing hormone and thereby produce the follicular stimulating hormone as well as the luteinizing hormone. The latter fuels the ovaries to produce estrogen and the former stimulates the egg production. An approximate of 30 different follicles begin to grow in the body and by day 7, the dominant follicle survives as the dormant ones degenerate. The dominant follicle becomes the only follicle that ovulates during a cycle. The estrogen encourages the uterus to thicken and grow.

In order to prepare the uterus for pregnancy, the dominant follicle produces 500 mcg of estrogen every day by mid-cycle. In addition, it also produces a small amount of progesterone. A consistent increase in the estrogen level for two to three consecutive days leads to the secretion of the luteinizing hormone from the pituitary glands. At the same time, a follicle stimulating hormone surge also occurs. A rapid and simultaneous peak of the two hormones signals the ovary to rupture the follicle and ovulation occurs. (The rupture of the follicle leads to the production of corpus luteum.)

After the ovulation is complete, the egg waits for a sperm. If there is no sperm available, the egg descends into the fallopian tubes and is expelled.

The final stage of the menstrual cycle is called the luteal stage. During this stage, the luteinizing hormone levels rise while the level of gonadotropin releasing hormones decreases. The corpus luteum, at this stage, is signaled by the luteinizing hormone to produce progesterone. The ovaries produce progesterone and estrogen. In case of no pregnancy, the un-utilized levels of estrogen and progesterone signal the shut off of the follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.

The high levels of progesterone influence the uterus to stop thickening and its maturity starts. The lining of the uterus is ready to accept a fertilized egg at this stage. However, if no conception occurs, 14 days following the ovulation, the menstruation cycle will begin. When there is no conception, the lining of the uterus (which was prepared to nourish the fertilized egg) breaks and comes out the female reproductive organ in the form of blood. In other words, the uterus cleans itself thoroughly in order for the whole process to begin again.

The menstrual cycle, though a monthly process, can be quite variable in terms of duration and time. More often than not, teenagers and young adults have irregular and unpredictable menstrual cycles. It is not uncommon and unusual to witness a shift in the cycle every month and throughout the years.

Hot Health
By Hot Health January 5, 2017 09:00
Warning: A non-numeric value encountered in /home/hothealt/public_html/wp-content/themes/allegro-theme/functions/other.php on line 93
Updated
Write a comment

No Comments

No Comments Yet!

Let me tell You a sad story ! There are no comments yet, but You can be first one to comment this article.

Write a comment
View comments

Write a comment


Warning: Illegal string offset 'rules' in /home/hothealt/public_html/wp-content/themes/allegro-theme/functions/filters.php on line 188
<

Categories

August 2020
S M T W T F S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Translate